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Thread: Tig 185 110/220

  1. #1

    Default Tig 185 110/220

    Just got my Tig 185 110/220. I can't find any info as far as specs go when operating on 110v. Are specs available somewhere?

  2. #2

    Default

    download the manual from the website!
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  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CMJ View Post
    Just got my Tig 185 110/220. I can't find any info as far as specs go when operating on 110v. Are specs available somewhere?
    http://www.everlastgenerators.com/do...-185-Micro.pdf you'll need a pdf file viewer like Free file viewer http://www.freefileviewer.com/

    PP 256 (SOLD) : 2013 250EX : I-MIG 250P/w 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60/w p80 torch : Hobart Handler 135/w 12' .023" Profax gun : 3M Speedglas 9100XX
    I'm not an expert or an Everlast employee, I'm just a hobby welder sharing my experience and helping where I can.

  4. #4

    Default

    You are incorrect. You're a senior member, and I'm sure you hate it when people could search before posting. This is not one of those posts. The only manual available is for the old 220V version. Does anyone have a real answer?

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zoama585 View Post
    The answer is not in the manual. It only has info for 220v.

  6. #6

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    what specs are you looking for . there sorta slow on updating manuals lol
    EVERLAST 250 EX , EVERLAST I-MIG 205 , EVERLAST spool gun NOW have 2 EVERLAST POWER PLASMA 50 plasma cutter's , LINCOLN 175HD MIG WELDER , VICTOR TORCH SET and many more tools to many to list

  7. #7

    Default

    I want to know rated output when running 110v.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CMJ View Post
    You are incorrect. You're a senior member, and I'm sure you hate it when people could search before posting. This is not one of those posts. The only manual available is for the old 220V version. Does anyone have a real answer?
    Call tech support.

    PP 256 (SOLD) : 2013 250EX : I-MIG 250P/w 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60/w p80 torch : Hobart Handler 135/w 12' .023" Profax gun : 3M Speedglas 9100XX
    I'm not an expert or an Everlast employee, I'm just a hobby welder sharing my experience and helping where I can.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zoama585 View Post
    Call tech support.
    I would like to have Everlast post the answer here. Then it will be searchable for future users. Afterall this specific forum is for questions related to Everlast tig welders. I suppose this forum could be shut down and everyone could call tech support. That would take a lot of fun out of it. I know you could probably ban me, but I'm just stating the obvious. At this point, I myself have trashed this thread as much as everyone else who has posted. This thread should have been two post long. The first was my question and the second should have been the answer by someone that knows, case closed. Please don't ban me for speaking the truth.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CMJ View Post
    I would like to have Everlast post the answer here. Then it will be searchable for future users. Afterall this specific forum is for questions related to Everlast tig welders. I suppose this forum could be shut down and everyone could call tech support. That would take a lot of fun out of it. I know you could probably ban me, but I'm just stating the obvious. At this point, I myself have trashed this thread as much as everyone else who has posted. This thread should have been two post long. The first was my question and the second should have been the answer by someone that knows, case closed. Please don't ban me for speaking the truth.
    I'm not here to ban anyone other than spambots. I'm a customer just like you... I just agreed to help a little with the forum. Maybe performance, who I believe writes the manuals will answer you soon.

    PP 256 (SOLD) : 2013 250EX : I-MIG 250P/w 20' Profax gun : Power Plasma 60/w p80 torch : Hobart Handler 135/w 12' .023" Profax gun : 3M Speedglas 9100XX
    I'm not an expert or an Everlast employee, I'm just a hobby welder sharing my experience and helping where I can.

  11. Default

    This has been mentioned by me in previous posts or threads somewhere on the Forum.
    But to be exact the amp output on 110v ( not 120v ) is 106 amps output.Your LED readout will reflect a higher number but actual is as mentioned .

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  12. Default

    Thank you.
    Does this apply for both AC and DC? Is there any problem with running the foot pedal at full throttle on 110V, or should I try and limit it to about 106amp on the LED readout?

  13. #13

    Default

    What Duncan is saying is that the actual output at 110V will be 106 amps, while there is some discrepancy in the digital display reading (a little higher). 120V, which is the true target voltage from the power companies in the US, may possibly yield a little more output, but in China they are tested at 110V from what I understand. Here I have up to 125 V.

    Here's a good summary I found online that states it simply.
    North American Voltage Ranges

    In the US and Canada, 220 volts, 230 volts, and 240 volts are used interchangeably to describe one voltage range that is used to power larger appliances. Similarly, 110 volts, 115 volts, and 120 volts all refer to the one voltage range that is available through the common electrical outlet. The sources of these seemingly different numbers are as follows:

    1. The 220 volt and 110 volt designations are older and familiar terminology, but are no longer used in either product design or by electric utilities in the US and Canada.
    2. The 230 volt and 115 volt terminology comes from equipment design standards. Equipment is commonly designed to operate at 230 or 115 volts plus or minus 10%.
    3. Electric utilities typically deliver electricity, under standard conditions, at 240 volts and 120 volts plus or minus 5% at the transformer.

    When one takes into account that equipment is designed to accept voltage variations of 10% at a minimum and that the electric utility regularly delivers electricity within 5% of their standard, there is a good match between the voltage the electric utility delivers and the voltage equipment was designed to use.
    Last edited by performance; 06-12-2012 at 08:34 PM.

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